Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Sun September 21st 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
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Gonzalez aims to tame Red Sox's power tandem
By signing Nelson Cruz, the Orioles provided a pretty strong demonstration of how one hitter can change the dynamic of a lineup. The Red Sox hope that Yoenis Cespedes can do the same over a full season in 2015.

Slump buster: Jones belts two homers in rout
By his lofty standards, Adam Jones has been in a slump. In the third inning against the Red Sox on Saturday, he ended that skid as his two-run homer tied the game. Two innings later, Jones turned a narrow lead into a four-run cushion -- and eventually a 7-2 win -- with another two-run blast.

O's reach 200-homer plateau for third straight year
Adam Jones' game-tying homer in the third inning against the Red Sox on Saturday pushed this Orioles team even deeper into the franchise's lore.

Orioles' Chris Davis was caught in crackdown
The Oriole slugger took amphetamines even as MLB beefed up scrutiny

Orioles slugger Chris Davis, suspended recently for using a banned stimulant, was caught amid a leaguewide crackdown that began three years ago as players' use of Adderall spiked, according to sports physicians and other experts.








Raid drives fear of driver's licenses among immigrants
Leading advocacy group warns that agents can access data

Leading advocacy group warns that agents can access data.








Firefighters battling two-alarm blaze in Federal Hill
A two-alarm fire broke out in several rowhouses Saturday evening in Federal Hill.


Baltimore Co. Republicans face Howard Co. Democrats in redrawn District 12
Veteran Senator Kasemeyer faces challenge from Republican Pippy

In Maryland's newly redrawn 12th legislative district — which slithers from southwestern Baltimore County to West Columbia in Howard County — the race for the State House is pretty neatly divided along county lines.







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Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

from conservativecontracts.com


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Once again - as happens so often - I have been positioned here on the living room couch, immersed in your blog. You are better than Fox News.

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11/15/2010

World’s forests can adapt to climate change, study says
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 7:54 am

Water shortages as a result of rising temperatures will not do as much damage as feared, evidence from ancient trees suggests

* Alok Jha, science correspondent

It is generally acknowledged that a warming world will harm the world’s forests. Higher temperatures mean water becomes more scarce, spelling death for plants – or perhaps not always.

According to a study of ancient rainforests, trees may be hardier than previously thought. Carlos Jaramillo, a scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), examined pollen from ancient plants trapped in rocks in Colombia and Venezuela. “There are many climactic models today suggesting that … if the temperature increases in the tropics by a couple of degrees, most of the forest is going to be extinct,” he said. “What we found was the opposite to what we were expecting: we didn’t find any extinction event [in plants] associated with the increase in temperature, we didn’t find that the precipitation decreased.”

In a study published todayin Science, Jaramillo and his team studied pollen grains and other biological indicators of plant life embedded in rocks formed around 56m years ago, during an abrupt period of warming called the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. CO2 levels had doubled in 10,000 years and the world was warmer by 3C-5C for 200,000 years.

Contrary to expectations, he found that forests bloomed with diversity. New species of plants, including those from the passionflower and chocolate families, evolved quicker as others became extinct. The study also shows moisture levels did not decrease significantly during the warm period. “It was totally unexpected,” Jaramillo said of the findings.

Klaus Winter of the STRI added: “It is remarkable that there is so much concern about the effects of greenhouse conditions on tropical forests. However, these horror scenarios probably have some validity if increased temperatures lead to more frequent or severe drought as some of the current predictions suggest.”

Last year, researchers at the Met Office Hadley Centre reported that a 2C rise above pre-industrial levels, widely considered the best-case scenario, would still see 20-40% of the Amazon die off within 100 years. A 3C rise would see 75% of the forest destroyed by drought in the next century, while a 4C rise would kill 85%.

Jaramillo found that the plants he studied seemed to become more efficient with their water use when it became more scarce. But he also cautioned that future risks for the world’s plant species did not end with climate change. Human action would continue to determine the fate of the world’s forests, he said.

“What the fossil record is showing is that plants have already the genetic variability to cope with high temperature and high levels of CO2.

“Rather than global warming, the [trouble] for tropical plants is deforestation. The fossil record shows that, when you don’t have humans around, the plants can deal with high temperatures and CO2.”

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Estimated 7,000 fans trade in Ray Rice jerseys (The Associated Press)
More than 7,000 fans showed up to exchange their Ray Rice jerseys for those of other Ravens players during a two-day event at Baltimore's home team officials said Saturday. The Ravens handed out 5,595 new jerseys before running out before midday Saturday, then issued more than 2,400 vouchers for fans to pick up their jerseys once new shipments arrive in October. Team spokesman Kevin Byrne said the Ravens spent ''six figures'' on the trade-in. ''The NFL licensed jerseys are not recyclable because of certain materials in parts of the jersey, so what we're going to do is offer them to companies who deal in scrap,'' Byrne said.

Browns' Gordon has suspension reduced to 10 games (The Associated Press)
Josh Gordon's tangled ordeal, full of legal twists and turns, has finally been straightened out. He can run a route back to the Browns this season. Cleveland's star wide receiver was reinstated into the NFL and had his one-year suspension reduced to 10 games Friday after the league announced changes to its drug policy. Gordon will be eligible to play in Cleveland's final six games after the league and NFL Players Association agreed on revisions to the substance abuse program two days after announcing changes on performance enhancing drugs.

Off-field violence injects unwanted reality into fantasy football (Reuters)
(Repeats story with no changes to headline or text) By Ben Klayman DETROIT, Sept 19 (Reuters) - Joe Gallo is not just a fan of National Football League running back Adrian Peterson, he "owns" him, as do thousands of other participants in the world of fantasy football. That explains why Gallo, a 31-year-old New Yorker who works in public relations, is so chagrined now that it appears Peterson could be out for the rest of the season after being benched by the Minnesota Vikings while he faces allegations of child abuse. "I still have Peterson on my bench," Gallo said. ...

NFL in crisis: Chief vows to put 'house in order' (AFP)
New York (AFP) - Embattled National Football League boss Roger Goodell vowed to put the sport's "house in order" amid a firestorm over the NFL's handling of off-field violence involving players.

Weather: Week 3 Forecasts (Rotoworld)
Join Jeff Brubach as he takes a look at weekend weather forecasts around the NFL.

Goodell: 'Same mistakes can never be repeated' (The Associated Press)
More defiant than contrite, Roger Goodell announced no sweeping changes in his first public statements in more than a week of turmoil surrounding the NFL's handling of players accused of crimes. The commissioner was definitive about one thing: He has not considered resigning. Goodell was short on specifics Friday as he discussed how he would address the rash of domestic violence incidents in the league. He said the NFL wants to implement new personal conduct policies by the Super Bowl.

Goodell tackles NFL domestic abuse crisis with vow to reform (Reuters)
By Larry Fine NEW YORK (Reuters) - A chastened NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said on Friday that the league's poor response to its domestic violence crisis will prompt an overhaul of how it deals with player behavior and punishment in America's most popular sports league. Goodell has been under fire since the NFL's slow and fumbled response to the domestic violence incident involving Baltimore Ravens star Ray Rice, whose knock-out punch to his then-fiancee was captured in a video that went viral last week. ...

NFL's Ravens knew about Rice video within hours: ESPN (Reuters)
(Reuters) - The Baltimore Ravens knew about the video of star running back Ray Rice knocking out his then-girlfriend in an elevator within hours of the assault and the NFL team later sought leniency for him, ESPN reported on Friday. ESPN's "Outside the Lines" said it spoke to more than 20 sources for the report, including team officials, current and former league officials, NFL Players Association representatives and associates, and advisers and friends of Rice. ...
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