Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Tue September 02nd 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
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O's piecing together stellar season after key injuries
The Orioles have been here before. Here, as in missing key members in a magnificent season with Baltimore (79-57) posting numbers that look, on paper at least, as if this is the year where everything went right.

Miscues mount as O's denied series sweep of Twins
Poor defense saddled Kevin Gausman with a hard-luck loss despite seven strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. The O's missed a chance to sweep the last-place Twins with a 6-4 loss in front of 33,156 on Monday.

Hardy day to day after leaving with lower back spasms
Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy exited Monday's 6-4 loss to the Minnesota Twins prior to the eighth inning with lower back spasms and is considered day to day.

Five injured in Ocean Pines boat explosion
Two hospitalized with burns; cause under investigation

Five people were injured near Ocean City on Sunday when their boat exploded, police said.








Anne Arundel police arrest brothers in Severn stabbing
Police say victim was stabbed multiple times; injuries serious but not life-threatening

Police arrested two brothers early Monday in the stabbing of a 30-year-old man in Severn.








Maryland eyed for data center with power plant
Company on the hunt for new site after University of Delaware kills plan to build on land it owns

Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community.







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Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

from conservativecontracts.com


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12/28/2010

Two from Powerline
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 10:58 pm

Barack Obama and Michael Vick

President Obama has an unfortunate habit of weighing in on controversies that are basically none of his business, most notoriously when he blasted the Cambridge police for arresting Henry Gates. This morning he did it again, telephoning Jeffrey Lurie, the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to express appreciation for the Eagles’ giving quarterback Michael Vick a second chance.

At the Washington Post, Ezra Klein terms this the “weirdest story of the morning,” noting that the White House now seems to have backed off on Obama’s comment about Vick, and instead characterizes the phone call as one relating to “plans for the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.” Klein thinks Obama was right the first time, and for once I agree.

Anyone who follows professional sports knows that there are many low-lifes in the ranks of professional athletes. Vick may well be one of them; certainly his running of a dog fighting ring was repellent. But the difference between Vick and pretty much everyone else is that Vick was actually punished for his misdeeds. He served two years in prison. In contrast, Ray Lewis’ experience was more typical: he was involved in a double murder, and his defense was that he only supplied the getaway car. Lewis got one year of probation and not long thereafter was the MVP of the Super Bowl.

In my view, Vick, having served his prison sentence, is even. He deserves the same employment opportunities as everyone else. The remarkable fact is that, after two years out of football, he is a better player now than he was before. If fans don’t want to cheer for him, that’s their business. But this time, I agree with Obama–on Vick, not “the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.”

PAUL demurs: My view of Obama’s comments on Vick is less favorable. It’s fine that Obama sees Vick’s story as a heartwarming tale of redemption, though I don’t. But his attempt to translate that tale into a larger lesson for society is problematic.

According to the owner of the Eagles, Obama told him that “so many of the people who serve time never get a second chance; it’s never a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Obama reportedly added that he was happy the Eagles did something on such a national stage to show faith in giving someone a second chance after such a major downfall.

Actually it is not uncommon for athletes to get the opportunity to play for sports teams after being incarcerated. Sports teams will take just about anyone they think can help them win, regardless of past problems. For example, baseball fans of a certain age will recall that Gates Brown and Ron LeFlore went from prison to the Detroit Tigers farm system and then to the major leagues. The major difference between them and Vick is that Vick was already an established pro, meaning that his team probably had more reason to believe he would help it than the Tigers did with Brown and LeFlore.

Talented relief pitcher Steve Howe received something like seven chances to pitch in the Major Leagues following drug suspensions and/or positive test results (I don’t recall that he was ever incarcerated, but the “redemption” issue is comparable). I always reckoned that five of those chances were down to his fastball and, given the scarcity of quality lefty relievers, the other two were because he pitched left-handed.

But Obama wasn’t just off-base in suggesting that there was something exceptional about a very talented and successful athlete getting a second chance. His deeper fallacy was to suppose that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick should serve as a model for employers generally.

I don’t know what the recidivism rate is for high-earning athletes who have been convicted of, in essence, murdering dogs. I suspect, however, that the Eagles were taking little risk that Vick would return to a life of crime.

But the recidivism rate for the average 20-something male who have been convicted of a felony is extremely high during the first few years after release from prison. This means that employers take an appreciable risk in hiring recently released felons, especially for certain types of jobs.

Accordingly, in my view there should not, in most cases, be “a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Employers should feel free to take into account the risks of employing such individuals. The Eagles experience with Vick is a special case that should, and I’m pretty certain will, have little resonance for most employers considering whether to hire most ex-prisoners.

Obama’s suggestion to the contrary is a knee-jerk reaction. It betrays the same lack of seriousness that has plagued some of his other efforts to weigh in on issues that are none of his business.

also:

How do they like him now?

I think it’s clear that the Democrats expected George W. Bush to be the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to electoral politics. Frankly, I expected this as well, albeit to a lesser degree than the Dems did.

But that’s not how things are turning out. It’s not just that Democratic efforts to make the 2010 election a referendum on the Bush presidency failed (predictably enough). There is also plenty of evidence that Bush is no longer very unpopular, if indeed he is unpopular at all.

Today’s news brings us additional evidence on this score. First, a Gallup poll rates him as the second most admired American. He’s well behind Barack Obama but slightly ahead of Bill Clinton.

Second, sales of Bush’s new book, Decision Points, have reached two million. The book was released early last month. As Peter Wehner notes, Bill Clinton’s biography, My Life, has sold 2.2 million since it was published in 2004. Bush’s publisher, Crown, said it could not think of any other non-fiction book that sold even one million copies this year.

It’s possible that Bush rates second on the most admired list and sold so many books based solely on the view of his hard-core supporters. But other evidence shows that his comeback is broader than that. For example, Bush has run neck-and-neck with President Obama in hypothetical presidential matchups this year.

How do we account for Bush’s comeback? I don’t think he’s made much new headway among arch-conservatives. 2010 saw the right turn away even more decisively than before from Bush’s “compassionate” or “big government” conservatism. Nor is there much reason to believe that the left has come to view Bush in a new light.

More likely, Bush’s revival is driven by those closer to the center. This seems fitting, since Bush was far more of a centrist than many of his critics assumed. Both of the wars he initiated had bipartisan, and strong popular, support when he initiated them. And he reached across the aisle on issues like No Child Left Behind and the prescription drug benefit. He even tried at the beginning of his presidency to compromise with Democrats on judicial nominees.

But why has the center revised its views of Bush? I suspect it’s because of the contrast between him and his successor, the alleged post-partisan. Obama’s first two years were far more ideologically single-minded than was the Bush presidency.

Moreover, and at least as importantly, Obama’s periodic belligerence and petulance must have reminded many of how gracefully Bush carried himself. Though significantly less popular as president than Obama, and more widely reviled, Bush never seemed to whine and rarely attempted to blame others. Unlike Obama, he was willing to praise his predecessor. And he steadfastly declines to criticize his successor.

Finally, the issue that contributed the most to Bush’s loss of popularity among those in the center — the Iraq war — looks quite different today than it did when centrists turned against him over it. The war remains controversial, of course, but I doubt that it is widely viewed as a disaster these days.

The Bush presidency continues to be important. His tax policy has been extended; the war he initiated in Afghanistan is being waged more vigorously than when Bush left office; Gitmo remains in operation, and so forth. But the ongoing importance of his presidency is substantive — key Bush policies remain compelling enough to retain — not political, as the Democrats had hoped.

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Colts face daunting challenge to protect Luck (The Associated Press)
Andrew Luck and A.Q. Shipley started getting reacquainted at Monday's practice. While this isn't how the Colts envisioned opening the season Sunday at Denver, plugging in yet another potential new starter at center, injuries have left them with no choice. ''Going through today, taking every snap with the first group out there, he was pretty much flawless,'' coach Chuck Pagano said. ''It's not easy, but we can help him on our end.'' The Colts need all the help they can get.

NFL Preview Week: Which teams have the toughest first four games? (Shutdown Corner)
The NFL regular season officially kicks off on Thursday when Green Bay travels to Seattle to take on the defending Super Bowl champion Seahawks. Shutdown Corner will be previewing everything to come all week, capped off by our awards and Super Bowl predictions on Thursday. You can’t earn or lose a playoff spot in the first month, but you don’t want to dig a deep hole you’ll spend the last three months of the season trying to get out of. Ask the Steelers and Giants. Both teams were popular playoff picks last year, but Pittsburgh started 0-4 and the Giants started 0-6. It didn’t matter that Pittsburgh won six of its last eight or New York won seven of its last 10. Neither one made the playoffs because of the slow starts. Remember, all 16 games count the same, so the ones starting this week have the same weight in the standings as the ones in the final weeks. These teams have the toughest (and easiest) first four game stretches to start the season:

NFL Preview Week: 12 second-year players ready to break out (Shutdown Corner)
Coaches often say that the biggest growth in an NFL player occurs between the first and second season. Rookie confusion can lead to second-year clarity and a sense of being unencumbered. In this rush-to-judgment league, it's easy to forget last year's draft class. But here are some of the second-year players who might be ready to remind everyone just how good they still are: Cleveland Browns pass rusher Barkevious Mingo — When you listen to him talk this preseason, the words "comfortable" and "confident" are used a lot. That's because Mingo, who was always seen as a work in progress entering the league, now has his body and mind properly shaped to be an impact player. The Browns will have a strong top three edge rushers with Paul Kruger, Jabaal Sheard and Mingo and can rotate them and keep them fresh. Mingo likely will be an open-side rusher (the offense's left side) and will be his best to use quickness and length to distract and disrupt quarterbacks. He had three of his five sacks in his first three NFL games but wore down. Now, in Year 2, Mingo should have the stamina to put up double digits in that category. [Smack talk season is back at Yahoo Sports: Sign up and play free Fantasy Football! ]

49er Ray McDonald accused of domestic violence (The Associated Press)
San Francisco 49ers defensive tackle Ray McDonald was arrested early Sunday on felony domestic violence charges after officers responded to a home in an upscale neighborhood, San Jose police said. Sgt. Heather Randol, a police spokeswoman, declined to discuss the circumstances that led to McDonald's arrest, saying only that officers had probable cause to take him into custody. ''I'm a good-hearted person.'' NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced tougher penalties this past week for players accused of domestic violence. ''The 49ers organization is aware of the recent reports regarding Ray McDonald and we take such matters seriously,'' general manager Trent Baalke said in a statement.

National Football League roundup (Reuters)
(The Sports Xchange) - San Francisco 49ers defensive tackle Ray McDonald was arrested and charged with felony domestic violence early Sunday morning. The Sacramento Bee reported that McDonald was booked by San Jose police at 5:30 a.m. Sunday for "inflicting injury on a spouse or cohabitant". He is scheduled to appear in court on Sept. 15, the day after the 49ers play a Sunday Night Football game against the Chicago Bears in Santa Clara. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced last week that the new punishment for those involved in domestic violence disputes would be six weeks for first-time offenders and a second offense would carry a lifetime ban.

Dolphins add 2 players, tweaking 53-man roster (The Associated Press)
Going with undrafted players is clearly not too risky for the Miami Dolphins. The Dolphins have added two more players who never got drafted, making moves Sunday to sign safety Brandian Ross and cornerback Sammy Seamster off waivers. He spent 2011 on Green Bay's practice squad as an undrafted free agent from Youngstown State. Seamster, an undrafted rookie out of Middle Tennessee State, was waived Saturday by Baltimore.

49ers' McDonald arrested for domestic violence (AFP)
San José (United States) (AFP) - National Football League veteran Ray McDonald was arrested early Sunday morning on charges of domestic violence. Law enforcement officials said the San Francisco 49er defensive end was booked in Santa Clara County jail for "inflicting injury on a spouse or cohabitant." McDonald was questioned and released after posting bail. The Sacramento Bee newspaper reported that McDonald was involved in an altercation with his pregnant fiancee while having a birthday party at his home.

Colts claim Shipley, announce practice squad (The Associated Press)
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- The Indianapolis Colts have claimed center A.Q. Shipley off waivers and started filling out their 10-man practice squad Sunday.
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