Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Fri August 29th 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
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Gonzalez looking for run support in opener vs. Twins
When the O's and Twins open their series Friday at Oriole Park, Orioles right-hander Miguel Gonzalez will face off against Minnesota righty Trevor May.

O's pad lead in AL East, capture series from Rays
J.J. Hardy drove in the go-ahead run in the Orioles' 5-4 win against the Rays at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on Thursday night.

Jones swipes home in O's double steal vs. Rays
To tie the game with the Rays at 2 in the bottom of the first inning on Thursday the O's turned to some small ball and Adam Jones was credited with a steal of home.

Chen, Gausman optioned, but won't miss a start
Both Wei-Yin Chen and Kevin Gausman, who have Minor League options remaining, were sent down after their last start -- on Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively -- to give the O's another position player.

State pulls $30 million from rail facility project in major victory for community activists
Cargo transfer operation considered critical for growth of port, has been in works but stalled for years

State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will.








Sylvia 'Cookie' Harris, advocate, wife of congressman, dies unexpectedly
She was a frequent presence in Annapolis for her causes, lawmakers say

Sylvia "Cookie" Harris, the wife of Rep. Andy Harris and a prominent anti-abortion advocate in Annapolis, died suddenly on Thursday, a spokeswoman for the congressman said.








Officials in Md., Va. investigate report that 164 voted in both states
Following report by conservative groups, Fairfax County elections board says it found evidence in 17 cases

The State Board of Elections has alerted the Office of the State Prosecutor to a report that 164 people voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the November 2012 presidential election, in violation of the law.








Feds say drug-sniffing dog with faked credentials may have been trained
Prosecutors are seeking $122,000 seized at BWI Airport

Federal prosecutors pursuing a drug money case based in part on a police dog whose certification has been questioned said in court filings this week that the dog might actually have been properly trained.


Auditors urge better tracking of public defender clients
Review finds office continues to face cost overruns and heavy workloads

A new state audit says Maryland's public defender's office is failing to properly document whether its clients are poor enough to need its help.







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Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

from conservativecontracts.com


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12/28/2010

Two from Powerline
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 10:58 pm

Barack Obama and Michael Vick

President Obama has an unfortunate habit of weighing in on controversies that are basically none of his business, most notoriously when he blasted the Cambridge police for arresting Henry Gates. This morning he did it again, telephoning Jeffrey Lurie, the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to express appreciation for the Eagles’ giving quarterback Michael Vick a second chance.

At the Washington Post, Ezra Klein terms this the “weirdest story of the morning,” noting that the White House now seems to have backed off on Obama’s comment about Vick, and instead characterizes the phone call as one relating to “plans for the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.” Klein thinks Obama was right the first time, and for once I agree.

Anyone who follows professional sports knows that there are many low-lifes in the ranks of professional athletes. Vick may well be one of them; certainly his running of a dog fighting ring was repellent. But the difference between Vick and pretty much everyone else is that Vick was actually punished for his misdeeds. He served two years in prison. In contrast, Ray Lewis’ experience was more typical: he was involved in a double murder, and his defense was that he only supplied the getaway car. Lewis got one year of probation and not long thereafter was the MVP of the Super Bowl.

In my view, Vick, having served his prison sentence, is even. He deserves the same employment opportunities as everyone else. The remarkable fact is that, after two years out of football, he is a better player now than he was before. If fans don’t want to cheer for him, that’s their business. But this time, I agree with Obama–on Vick, not “the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.”

PAUL demurs: My view of Obama’s comments on Vick is less favorable. It’s fine that Obama sees Vick’s story as a heartwarming tale of redemption, though I don’t. But his attempt to translate that tale into a larger lesson for society is problematic.

According to the owner of the Eagles, Obama told him that “so many of the people who serve time never get a second chance; it’s never a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Obama reportedly added that he was happy the Eagles did something on such a national stage to show faith in giving someone a second chance after such a major downfall.

Actually it is not uncommon for athletes to get the opportunity to play for sports teams after being incarcerated. Sports teams will take just about anyone they think can help them win, regardless of past problems. For example, baseball fans of a certain age will recall that Gates Brown and Ron LeFlore went from prison to the Detroit Tigers farm system and then to the major leagues. The major difference between them and Vick is that Vick was already an established pro, meaning that his team probably had more reason to believe he would help it than the Tigers did with Brown and LeFlore.

Talented relief pitcher Steve Howe received something like seven chances to pitch in the Major Leagues following drug suspensions and/or positive test results (I don’t recall that he was ever incarcerated, but the “redemption” issue is comparable). I always reckoned that five of those chances were down to his fastball and, given the scarcity of quality lefty relievers, the other two were because he pitched left-handed.

But Obama wasn’t just off-base in suggesting that there was something exceptional about a very talented and successful athlete getting a second chance. His deeper fallacy was to suppose that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick should serve as a model for employers generally.

I don’t know what the recidivism rate is for high-earning athletes who have been convicted of, in essence, murdering dogs. I suspect, however, that the Eagles were taking little risk that Vick would return to a life of crime.

But the recidivism rate for the average 20-something male who have been convicted of a felony is extremely high during the first few years after release from prison. This means that employers take an appreciable risk in hiring recently released felons, especially for certain types of jobs.

Accordingly, in my view there should not, in most cases, be “a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Employers should feel free to take into account the risks of employing such individuals. The Eagles experience with Vick is a special case that should, and I’m pretty certain will, have little resonance for most employers considering whether to hire most ex-prisoners.

Obama’s suggestion to the contrary is a knee-jerk reaction. It betrays the same lack of seriousness that has plagued some of his other efforts to weigh in on issues that are none of his business.

also:

How do they like him now?

I think it’s clear that the Democrats expected George W. Bush to be the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to electoral politics. Frankly, I expected this as well, albeit to a lesser degree than the Dems did.

But that’s not how things are turning out. It’s not just that Democratic efforts to make the 2010 election a referendum on the Bush presidency failed (predictably enough). There is also plenty of evidence that Bush is no longer very unpopular, if indeed he is unpopular at all.

Today’s news brings us additional evidence on this score. First, a Gallup poll rates him as the second most admired American. He’s well behind Barack Obama but slightly ahead of Bill Clinton.

Second, sales of Bush’s new book, Decision Points, have reached two million. The book was released early last month. As Peter Wehner notes, Bill Clinton’s biography, My Life, has sold 2.2 million since it was published in 2004. Bush’s publisher, Crown, said it could not think of any other non-fiction book that sold even one million copies this year.

It’s possible that Bush rates second on the most admired list and sold so many books based solely on the view of his hard-core supporters. But other evidence shows that his comeback is broader than that. For example, Bush has run neck-and-neck with President Obama in hypothetical presidential matchups this year.

How do we account for Bush’s comeback? I don’t think he’s made much new headway among arch-conservatives. 2010 saw the right turn away even more decisively than before from Bush’s “compassionate” or “big government” conservatism. Nor is there much reason to believe that the left has come to view Bush in a new light.

More likely, Bush’s revival is driven by those closer to the center. This seems fitting, since Bush was far more of a centrist than many of his critics assumed. Both of the wars he initiated had bipartisan, and strong popular, support when he initiated them. And he reached across the aisle on issues like No Child Left Behind and the prescription drug benefit. He even tried at the beginning of his presidency to compromise with Democrats on judicial nominees.

But why has the center revised its views of Bush? I suspect it’s because of the contrast between him and his successor, the alleged post-partisan. Obama’s first two years were far more ideologically single-minded than was the Bush presidency.

Moreover, and at least as importantly, Obama’s periodic belligerence and petulance must have reminded many of how gracefully Bush carried himself. Though significantly less popular as president than Obama, and more widely reviled, Bush never seemed to whine and rarely attempted to blame others. Unlike Obama, he was willing to praise his predecessor. And he steadfastly declines to criticize his successor.

Finally, the issue that contributed the most to Bush’s loss of popularity among those in the center — the Iraq war — looks quite different today than it did when centrists turned against him over it. The war remains controversial, of course, but I doubt that it is widely viewed as a disaster these days.

The Bush presidency continues to be important. His tax policy has been extended; the war he initiated in Afghanistan is being waged more vigorously than when Bush left office; Gitmo remains in operation, and so forth. But the ongoing importance of his presidency is substantive — key Bush policies remain compelling enough to retain — not political, as the Democrats had hoped.

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Thursday's Sports In Brief (The Associated Press)
Good as she is, even Serena Williams can find it tough to deal with swirling wind, so much so that she double-faulted three times in her first service game against 81st-ranked American Vania King. While buzz around the tournament grounds built all day waiting for 15-year-old CiCi Bellis to play her second-round match at night - she wound up losing - Williams ran her U.S. Open winning streak to 16 matches as she tries to become the first woman to win three consecutive titles at Flushing Meadows since Chris Evert took four in a row from 1975-78. Two past major champions, No. 8 Ana Ivanovic and No. 24 Sam Stosur, lost, as did No. 23 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and No. 27 Madison Keys, bringing the total to 11 seeded women gone after only two rounds.

Ravens run over Saints 22-13 (The Associated Press)
To Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh, finishing the preseason perfect mattered. Harbaugh rested his regulars and watched with delight as Ray Rice's backups ground out 214 yards rushing in a 22-13 victory over the New Orleans Saints on Thursday night. Kicker Justin Tucker was among the few Ravens regulars who did not get the night off for the final exhibition game, and his performance was also one of the reasons the Ravens closed out their four-game exhibition slate without a loss. ''The thing that I love about these four preseason games is that guys work so hard,'' Harbaugh said.

Game roundup: Manziel solid in Browns' victory (The SportsXchange)
Brian Hoyer looked sharp and rookie Johnnie Manziel connected for a touchdown as the Cleveland Browns rolled past the Chicago Bears 33-13 on Thursday night at First Energy Stadium. Hoyer went 6-for-8 and looked confident as he drove the Browns to a first-quarter score. In the second quarter, he led the Browns on a five-play 80-yard drive, which was capped by a one-yard TD pass to Jim Dray. His Arizona counterpart, Chandler Catanzaro kicked three field goals.

Public shaming of NFL commish Roger Goodell shows power, pitfalls of social media (Yahoo Sports)
All sports bosses are now held accountable by the public (including athletes on social media) in an unprecedented way. Commissioners are expected to be transparent in a refreshing way. But that transparency has its risks.

NFL roundup: Goodell toughens stance on domestic violence (The SportsXchange)
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced a dramatic new domestic violence policy for the league Thursday, admitting "I didn't get it right" with Ray Rice. The measures were announced in a letter to all team owners and come after widespread criticism and a social media firestorm that Goodell absorbed following his handling of discipline for the Baltimore Ravens running back. A first offense under the new domestic violence policy calls for a six-game suspension, while a second offense would result in a lifetime ban. The two-game suspension for Rice left many with the impression that the NFL did not take domestic violence seriously as a crime.

NFL, under public pressure, toughens domestic violence bans (Reuters)
By Eric Kelsey LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The National Football League, stung by a public uproar from critics who said it was too lenient on a player accused of assaulting his fiancée, on Thursday announced stricter domestic violence penalties. Players will now receive a six-game ban for a first-time violation of the league's policy and an indefinite ban for a second violation, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a letter to team owners obtained by Reuters. Goodell did not mention Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice by name, but apologized for how the league handled his suspension. Women's and family groups blasted the NFL after it suspended Rice for only two games in July for allegedly assaulting his then-fiancee and now wife.

After Rice, NFL increases domestic violence bans (The Associated Press)
Acknowledging he ''didn't get it right'' with a two-game suspension for Ravens running back Ray Rice, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced tougher penalties for players accused of domestic violence, including six weeks for a first offense and at least a year for a second. In a letter sent to all 32 team owners Thursday and obtained by The Associated Press, Goodell never mentions Rice by name but makes clear references to the Baltimore player who was charged with assault after being caught on video dragging his then-fiancee off a casino elevator. ''My disciplinary decision led the public to question our sincerity, our commitment, and whether we understood the toll that domestic violence inflicts on so many families. The NFL suspended six players for one game each, and Rice was the second player to be suspended for two games.

Goodell apologizes, toughens domestic abuse policy (AFP)
National Football League commissioner Roger Goodell announced tougher penalties for domestic violence Thursday, including potential life bans for repeat offenders, and apologized for issuing a weak abuse penalty last month. In a letter to team owners outlining revisions to the NFL's personal conduct policy, Goodell said that violations regarding assault, battery, domestic violence or sexual assault involving physical force will bring a six-game ban without pay and a second offense will bring a minimum one-year ban from the NFL. The moves come after criticism of Goodell's handling of the domestic violence case involving Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice.

Goodell admits Rice mistake in laying out new policy (The SportsXchange)
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced a dramatic new domestic violence policy for the league Thursday, admitting "I didn't get it right" with Ray Rice. The measures were announced in a letter to all team owners and come after widespread criticism and a social media firestorm that Goodell absorbed following his handling of discipline for the Baltimore Ravens running back. A first offense under the new domestic violence policy calls for a six-game suspension, while a second offense would result in a lifetime ban. The two-game suspension for Rice left many with the impression that the NFL did not take domestic violence seriously as a crime.

AP source: Gordon wants to play in CFL but can't (The Associated Press)
Josh Gordon can't run a deep pass route into Canada and play. The Cleveland Browns' suspended star wide receiver wanted to play in the Canadian Football League during his indefinite suspension, but CFL rules prohibit him from doing so. Gordon, whose season-long suspension by the NFL was upheld on Wednesday, asked the Browns for permission to play for the Calgary Stampeders, a person familiar with the Pro Bowler's situation told The Associated Press on Thursday. CFL spokesman Jamie Dykstra said the only way Gordon could play in the league is if he was released by the Browns and became a free agent.

Champ Bailey's role unclear as Saints host Ravens (The Associated Press)
After playing at an elite level for more than a decade, cornerback Champ Bailey enters the final game of the 2014 preseason with little certainty about what kind of role he might fill in the Saints' secondary. He is healthy enough to play against Baltimore on Thursday night, but coaches may still decide the Saints' long-term interests would be better served by sitting Bailey out to ensure he's healthy when the games start counting in the standings. Bailey probably needs more time in the field in the preseason if he wants a legitimate chance to start against the Falcons to open the regular season on Sept. 7, but even he acknowledged, ''I've just got to make sure my body feels good before I step out there in Atlanta.'' Either way, Bailey said his designation as a starter or backup won't affect his approach. Regardless of how much I'm playing, I'm always out there competing like I'm the starter or going to be.'' After Bailey was let go by Denver last offseason, the Saints brought him in, hoping his experience would help a young secondary, and they he'd be healthy enough to continue being effective for another season.

Team Report - DALLAS COWBOYS (The SportsXchange)
Cowboys ragged, Romo roughed up in dress rehearsal
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