Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Wed September 17th 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
Our Contributors:
Comments:
Categories


Barlow close to O's hearts on celebratory night
Never was Monica Barlow's memory on better display than after the Orioles' 8-2 victory over the Blue Jays on Tuesday night, as the O's clinched the American League East with hands full of champagne and their hearts with the longtime public-relations director.

Home field throughout postseason in play for O's
The most superstitious of Orioles fans can begin planning for the postseason. Baltimore clinched the American League East with an 8-2 win over the second-place Blue Jays on Tuesday. In all likelihood, the O's will be hosting one of the AL Division Series.

Turn back the clock: O's return to perch atop AL East
"Happy Days Are Here Again" pumped through the speakers at Camden Yards as thousands of rabid fans stayed on hand to celebrate from the seats and watch Orioles players and front-office staff spill out onto the field in a haze of celebratory champagne and drenched embraces.

Board approves changing Baltimore Arena's name to Royal Farms Arena
Deal would bring in $250,000 a year over five years

Deal would bring in $250,000 a year over five years.








New Jersey Gov. Christie to raise money for Hogan
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan will get a helping hand today from one of his party's best-known figures.








Special Olympics run to close northbound bore of Fort McHenry Tunnel
Annual event will take place Sunday morning

One of the two bores carrying northbound Interstate 95 traffic through the Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore will be closed for several hours on Sunday morning for Special Olympics Maryland's sixth annual 5-kilometer run and walk fundraiser.








Woman injured in armed robbery at The Garden Inn
A 20-year-old woman was attacked and robbed inside her room at The Garden Inn on Route 198 Tuesday night, according to Anne Arundel County police.








Hampden resident leads a revival of old-time music
Brad Kolodner plays banjo and fiddle and organizes 'jams' and square dancing events

Brad Kolodner plays banjo and fiddle and organizes 'jams' and square dancing events.


MARC train service restored for afternoon commute
Afternoon MARC service to Perryville and Aberdeen will be restored for the afternoon commute, according to the Maryland Transit Administration.







Comments about Baltimore Reporter:

Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

from conservativecontracts.com


I love your blog

Once again - as happens so often - I have been positioned here on the living room couch, immersed in your blog. You are better than Fox News.

Kevin Dayhoff



Awards and Rankings:

Voted one of the best local blogs:
Baltimore Examiner: 2006



Voted Top 10 most influential blog in Maryland in 2007.
Blog Net News



ElseWhere
Other sites I write for:
Flopping Aces
and Red Maryland

Want to help?
Baltimore Reporter is looking for writers to help counter the biased media. Email us if interested.

My Count Since 10/11/07
~ 22977 ~
Site Meter

.

   

12/28/2010

Two from Powerline
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 10:58 pm

Barack Obama and Michael Vick

President Obama has an unfortunate habit of weighing in on controversies that are basically none of his business, most notoriously when he blasted the Cambridge police for arresting Henry Gates. This morning he did it again, telephoning Jeffrey Lurie, the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to express appreciation for the Eagles’ giving quarterback Michael Vick a second chance.

At the Washington Post, Ezra Klein terms this the “weirdest story of the morning,” noting that the White House now seems to have backed off on Obama’s comment about Vick, and instead characterizes the phone call as one relating to “plans for the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.” Klein thinks Obama was right the first time, and for once I agree.

Anyone who follows professional sports knows that there are many low-lifes in the ranks of professional athletes. Vick may well be one of them; certainly his running of a dog fighting ring was repellent. But the difference between Vick and pretty much everyone else is that Vick was actually punished for his misdeeds. He served two years in prison. In contrast, Ray Lewis’ experience was more typical: he was involved in a double murder, and his defense was that he only supplied the getaway car. Lewis got one year of probation and not long thereafter was the MVP of the Super Bowl.

In my view, Vick, having served his prison sentence, is even. He deserves the same employment opportunities as everyone else. The remarkable fact is that, after two years out of football, he is a better player now than he was before. If fans don’t want to cheer for him, that’s their business. But this time, I agree with Obama–on Vick, not “the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.”

PAUL demurs: My view of Obama’s comments on Vick is less favorable. It’s fine that Obama sees Vick’s story as a heartwarming tale of redemption, though I don’t. But his attempt to translate that tale into a larger lesson for society is problematic.

According to the owner of the Eagles, Obama told him that “so many of the people who serve time never get a second chance; it’s never a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Obama reportedly added that he was happy the Eagles did something on such a national stage to show faith in giving someone a second chance after such a major downfall.

Actually it is not uncommon for athletes to get the opportunity to play for sports teams after being incarcerated. Sports teams will take just about anyone they think can help them win, regardless of past problems. For example, baseball fans of a certain age will recall that Gates Brown and Ron LeFlore went from prison to the Detroit Tigers farm system and then to the major leagues. The major difference between them and Vick is that Vick was already an established pro, meaning that his team probably had more reason to believe he would help it than the Tigers did with Brown and LeFlore.

Talented relief pitcher Steve Howe received something like seven chances to pitch in the Major Leagues following drug suspensions and/or positive test results (I don’t recall that he was ever incarcerated, but the “redemption” issue is comparable). I always reckoned that five of those chances were down to his fastball and, given the scarcity of quality lefty relievers, the other two were because he pitched left-handed.

But Obama wasn’t just off-base in suggesting that there was something exceptional about a very talented and successful athlete getting a second chance. His deeper fallacy was to suppose that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick should serve as a model for employers generally.

I don’t know what the recidivism rate is for high-earning athletes who have been convicted of, in essence, murdering dogs. I suspect, however, that the Eagles were taking little risk that Vick would return to a life of crime.

But the recidivism rate for the average 20-something male who have been convicted of a felony is extremely high during the first few years after release from prison. This means that employers take an appreciable risk in hiring recently released felons, especially for certain types of jobs.

Accordingly, in my view there should not, in most cases, be “a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Employers should feel free to take into account the risks of employing such individuals. The Eagles experience with Vick is a special case that should, and I’m pretty certain will, have little resonance for most employers considering whether to hire most ex-prisoners.

Obama’s suggestion to the contrary is a knee-jerk reaction. It betrays the same lack of seriousness that has plagued some of his other efforts to weigh in on issues that are none of his business.

also:

How do they like him now?

I think it’s clear that the Democrats expected George W. Bush to be the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to electoral politics. Frankly, I expected this as well, albeit to a lesser degree than the Dems did.

But that’s not how things are turning out. It’s not just that Democratic efforts to make the 2010 election a referendum on the Bush presidency failed (predictably enough). There is also plenty of evidence that Bush is no longer very unpopular, if indeed he is unpopular at all.

Today’s news brings us additional evidence on this score. First, a Gallup poll rates him as the second most admired American. He’s well behind Barack Obama but slightly ahead of Bill Clinton.

Second, sales of Bush’s new book, Decision Points, have reached two million. The book was released early last month. As Peter Wehner notes, Bill Clinton’s biography, My Life, has sold 2.2 million since it was published in 2004. Bush’s publisher, Crown, said it could not think of any other non-fiction book that sold even one million copies this year.

It’s possible that Bush rates second on the most admired list and sold so many books based solely on the view of his hard-core supporters. But other evidence shows that his comeback is broader than that. For example, Bush has run neck-and-neck with President Obama in hypothetical presidential matchups this year.

How do we account for Bush’s comeback? I don’t think he’s made much new headway among arch-conservatives. 2010 saw the right turn away even more decisively than before from Bush’s “compassionate” or “big government” conservatism. Nor is there much reason to believe that the left has come to view Bush in a new light.

More likely, Bush’s revival is driven by those closer to the center. This seems fitting, since Bush was far more of a centrist than many of his critics assumed. Both of the wars he initiated had bipartisan, and strong popular, support when he initiated them. And he reached across the aisle on issues like No Child Left Behind and the prescription drug benefit. He even tried at the beginning of his presidency to compromise with Democrats on judicial nominees.

But why has the center revised its views of Bush? I suspect it’s because of the contrast between him and his successor, the alleged post-partisan. Obama’s first two years were far more ideologically single-minded than was the Bush presidency.

Moreover, and at least as importantly, Obama’s periodic belligerence and petulance must have reminded many of how gracefully Bush carried himself. Though significantly less popular as president than Obama, and more widely reviled, Bush never seemed to whine and rarely attempted to blame others. Unlike Obama, he was willing to praise his predecessor. And he steadfastly declines to criticize his successor.

Finally, the issue that contributed the most to Bush’s loss of popularity among those in the center — the Iraq war — looks quite different today than it did when centrists turned against him over it. The war remains controversial, of course, but I doubt that it is widely viewed as a disaster these days.

The Bush presidency continues to be important. His tax policy has been extended; the war he initiated in Afghanistan is being waged more vigorously than when Bush left office; Gitmo remains in operation, and so forth. But the ongoing importance of his presidency is substantive — key Bush policies remain compelling enough to retain — not political, as the Democrats had hoped.

Comments

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a comment

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.







Search

 
Baltimore Weather

Current Conditions:
Partly Cloudy, 73 F
TheCaffeinatedMind.com
What type of smartphone do you have?
Blackberry
iPhone
Windows based
Android based


View results
Version 2.03
FACING UP TO THE
Nation's Finances
National Debt Clock

After making 'mistake,' Vikings bench RB Peterson (The Associated Press)
Hours after reversing course and benching Adrian Peterson indefinitely, Minnesota Vikings owner Zygi Wilf said Wednesday that the team ''made a mistake'' in bringing back their superstar running back following his indictment on a felony child-abuse charge in Texas. Our goal is always to make the decision we feel is right for the Minnesota Vikings ... We want to be sure we get this right.'' Wilf and his co-owner brother, Mark Wilf, announced their decision around 2 a.m. Eastern after concluding it was best for the Vikings and for Peterson, their All-Pro workhorse who has played his entire NFL career with Minnesota and is accused of injuring his 4-year-old son by spanking him with a wooden switch earlier this year. A day-and-a-half earlier, the Vikings said Peterson would rejoin the team after missing Sunday's loss to New England. The Vikings had at least one major sponsorship suspended.

Atlanta Falcons host rapidly sinking Buccaneers (The Associated Press)
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were supposed to be vastly improved this year. The standings show a big, fat zero in the win column.

Pelosi: NFL Rice investigation sufficient for now (The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says that for now the NFL's investigation into its handling of the domestic violence case involving running back Ray Rice is an appropriate response.

Week 2 Target Watch: AFC (Rotoworld)
Chet Gresham takes you through all the targets and touches for Week 2 in the AFC.

Union appeals Rice's indefinite suspension by NFL (The Associated Press)
The NFL players' union appealed Ray Rice's indefinite suspension Tuesday night, saying that he shouldn't be punished twice for punching his fiancee in a casino elevator. Rice was originally handed a two-game suspension in July under the NFL's personal conduct policy after he was charged with assault for the Feb. 15 attack. Within hours, the Ravens released Rice and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell extended the suspension to indefinite based on the ''new evidence.'' Goodell and the Ravens say they never saw the video before Sept. 8. ''This action taken by our union is to protect the due process rights of all NFL players,'' the NFL Players Association said in a statement.

NFL star Peterson suspended over child abuse charge (AFP)
Washington (AFP) - The Minnesota Vikings reversed course Wednesday and suspended their star running back Adrian Peterson amid an outcry over charges he abused his son by beating him severely.

Tuesday's Sports In Brief (The Associated Press)
NFL The Minnesota Vikings placed star running back Adrian Peterson on the exempt-commissioner's permission list, a move that will require him to stay away from the team while he addresses child abuse charges. The Vikings made the announcement early Wednesday morning after initially deciding that Peterson could play with the team while the legal process played out. The Vikings came under heavy criticism for their initial stance. Several sponsors responded by either suspending their deals with the Vikings or severing ties with Peterson.

Rice appeals against indefinite NFL suspension for knocking out wife (Reuters)
By Steve Ginsburg WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Ray Rice appealed against his indefinite suspension by the National Football League on Tuesday for a one-punch knockout of his wife as the former Baltimore Ravens running back tries to resuscitate his once-flourishing career. Meanwhile, the NFL continues to grapple with domestic violence issues as some of its top players, including Adrian Peterson, are under scrutiny both by the league and the public. ...

NFL players union appeals Rice assault suspension (AFP)
New York (AFP) - The NFL Players Union appealed the indefinite suspension meted out to Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice after video showed him punching his fiancee.

Beer sponsor Anheuser-Busch reproaches NFL over domestic abuse (Reuters)
By Steve Ginsburg and Anjali Athavaley (Reuters) - Anheuser-Busch publicly chastised the National Football League on Tuesday for its handling of domestic violence cases, making the NFL's official beer sponsor the first major advertiser to put pressure on America's most popular sports league. In a brief but strongly worded statement, Anheuser-Busch, the maker of Budweiser and NFL official beer Bud Light, said it was "disappointed and increasingly concerned by the recent incidents that have overshadowed this NFL season. ...

Jackson rips NFL for lack of diversity in advisers (The Associated Press)
NEW YORK (AP) -- The Rev. Jesse Jackson criticized the NFL on Tuesday for not including any African-American women when it brought on three domestic violence experts as consultants.
Maryland News
Links To Others
Maryland Blogger Alliance

National News
Support the Baltimore Reporter. Buy a C.D.



Thank You












Advertise with Us!
Baltimore Reporter is looking for advertisers to help keep this site going. Email us here.
]
Please ignore the screen cleaner!