Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Thu April 24th 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
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Hardy, Wieters return to Orioles lineup
Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy and catcher Matt Wieters returned to the lineup on Wednesday night after the pair was sidelined with minor injuries sustained over the weekend in Boston.

Bundy, Machado continuing to make progress
Orioles top pitching prospect Dylan Bundy threw eight curveballs in Wednesdays bullpen, the first time he's thrown that pitch since undergoing Tommy John surgery last year.

Initiatives keep Camden Yards eco-friendly
The Orioles were in Toronto for Earth Day Tuesday, but Baltimore has a slew of green initiatives that help keep Camden Yards eco-friendly.

Machado set to begin rehab assignment
Manny Machado will begin his highly-anticipated rehab assignment on Friday for Class A Advanced Frederick as the Orioles third baseman works toward a return early next month.

Community college applicant alleges he was rejected because of religious beliefs
Lawsuit says Community College of Baltimore County official told him to leave beliefs out of interview

A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, claiming he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs.








Gansler sharpens attacks on Brown
Two Democrats spar over health care, veterans and BRAC in contentious race for governor

Democrat Douglas F. Gansler sharpened his public attacks against rival Anthony Brown Wednesday, charging that his chief political opponent "did absolutely nothing" during his tenure as lieutenant governor and failed at the two main tasks he was given.








Michael Phelps says he's 'having fun' as he returns to the pool this week
18-time gold medalist to swim 100-meter butterfly in Mesa Grand Prix on Thursday

MESA, ARIZ. — Michael Phelps couldn’t say it enough times, even joking that he would bore questioners with his repetitive explanation for returning to competitive swimming.







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Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

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12/28/2010

Two from Powerline
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 10:58 pm

Barack Obama and Michael Vick

President Obama has an unfortunate habit of weighing in on controversies that are basically none of his business, most notoriously when he blasted the Cambridge police for arresting Henry Gates. This morning he did it again, telephoning Jeffrey Lurie, the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to express appreciation for the Eagles’ giving quarterback Michael Vick a second chance.

At the Washington Post, Ezra Klein terms this the “weirdest story of the morning,” noting that the White House now seems to have backed off on Obama’s comment about Vick, and instead characterizes the phone call as one relating to “plans for the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.” Klein thinks Obama was right the first time, and for once I agree.

Anyone who follows professional sports knows that there are many low-lifes in the ranks of professional athletes. Vick may well be one of them; certainly his running of a dog fighting ring was repellent. But the difference between Vick and pretty much everyone else is that Vick was actually punished for his misdeeds. He served two years in prison. In contrast, Ray Lewis’ experience was more typical: he was involved in a double murder, and his defense was that he only supplied the getaway car. Lewis got one year of probation and not long thereafter was the MVP of the Super Bowl.

In my view, Vick, having served his prison sentence, is even. He deserves the same employment opportunities as everyone else. The remarkable fact is that, after two years out of football, he is a better player now than he was before. If fans don’t want to cheer for him, that’s their business. But this time, I agree with Obama–on Vick, not “the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.”

PAUL demurs: My view of Obama’s comments on Vick is less favorable. It’s fine that Obama sees Vick’s story as a heartwarming tale of redemption, though I don’t. But his attempt to translate that tale into a larger lesson for society is problematic.

According to the owner of the Eagles, Obama told him that “so many of the people who serve time never get a second chance; it’s never a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Obama reportedly added that he was happy the Eagles did something on such a national stage to show faith in giving someone a second chance after such a major downfall.

Actually it is not uncommon for athletes to get the opportunity to play for sports teams after being incarcerated. Sports teams will take just about anyone they think can help them win, regardless of past problems. For example, baseball fans of a certain age will recall that Gates Brown and Ron LeFlore went from prison to the Detroit Tigers farm system and then to the major leagues. The major difference between them and Vick is that Vick was already an established pro, meaning that his team probably had more reason to believe he would help it than the Tigers did with Brown and LeFlore.

Talented relief pitcher Steve Howe received something like seven chances to pitch in the Major Leagues following drug suspensions and/or positive test results (I don’t recall that he was ever incarcerated, but the “redemption” issue is comparable). I always reckoned that five of those chances were down to his fastball and, given the scarcity of quality lefty relievers, the other two were because he pitched left-handed.

But Obama wasn’t just off-base in suggesting that there was something exceptional about a very talented and successful athlete getting a second chance. His deeper fallacy was to suppose that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick should serve as a model for employers generally.

I don’t know what the recidivism rate is for high-earning athletes who have been convicted of, in essence, murdering dogs. I suspect, however, that the Eagles were taking little risk that Vick would return to a life of crime.

But the recidivism rate for the average 20-something male who have been convicted of a felony is extremely high during the first few years after release from prison. This means that employers take an appreciable risk in hiring recently released felons, especially for certain types of jobs.

Accordingly, in my view there should not, in most cases, be “a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Employers should feel free to take into account the risks of employing such individuals. The Eagles experience with Vick is a special case that should, and I’m pretty certain will, have little resonance for most employers considering whether to hire most ex-prisoners.

Obama’s suggestion to the contrary is a knee-jerk reaction. It betrays the same lack of seriousness that has plagued some of his other efforts to weigh in on issues that are none of his business.

also:

How do they like him now?

I think it’s clear that the Democrats expected George W. Bush to be the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to electoral politics. Frankly, I expected this as well, albeit to a lesser degree than the Dems did.

But that’s not how things are turning out. It’s not just that Democratic efforts to make the 2010 election a referendum on the Bush presidency failed (predictably enough). There is also plenty of evidence that Bush is no longer very unpopular, if indeed he is unpopular at all.

Today’s news brings us additional evidence on this score. First, a Gallup poll rates him as the second most admired American. He’s well behind Barack Obama but slightly ahead of Bill Clinton.

Second, sales of Bush’s new book, Decision Points, have reached two million. The book was released early last month. As Peter Wehner notes, Bill Clinton’s biography, My Life, has sold 2.2 million since it was published in 2004. Bush’s publisher, Crown, said it could not think of any other non-fiction book that sold even one million copies this year.

It’s possible that Bush rates second on the most admired list and sold so many books based solely on the view of his hard-core supporters. But other evidence shows that his comeback is broader than that. For example, Bush has run neck-and-neck with President Obama in hypothetical presidential matchups this year.

How do we account for Bush’s comeback? I don’t think he’s made much new headway among arch-conservatives. 2010 saw the right turn away even more decisively than before from Bush’s “compassionate” or “big government” conservatism. Nor is there much reason to believe that the left has come to view Bush in a new light.

More likely, Bush’s revival is driven by those closer to the center. This seems fitting, since Bush was far more of a centrist than many of his critics assumed. Both of the wars he initiated had bipartisan, and strong popular, support when he initiated them. And he reached across the aisle on issues like No Child Left Behind and the prescription drug benefit. He even tried at the beginning of his presidency to compromise with Democrats on judicial nominees.

But why has the center revised its views of Bush? I suspect it’s because of the contrast between him and his successor, the alleged post-partisan. Obama’s first two years were far more ideologically single-minded than was the Bush presidency.

Moreover, and at least as importantly, Obama’s periodic belligerence and petulance must have reminded many of how gracefully Bush carried himself. Though significantly less popular as president than Obama, and more widely reviled, Bush never seemed to whine and rarely attempted to blame others. Unlike Obama, he was willing to praise his predecessor. And he steadfastly declines to criticize his successor.

Finally, the issue that contributed the most to Bush’s loss of popularity among those in the center — the Iraq war — looks quite different today than it did when centrists turned against him over it. The war remains controversial, of course, but I doubt that it is widely viewed as a disaster these days.

The Bush presidency continues to be important. His tax policy has been extended; the war he initiated in Afghanistan is being waged more vigorously than when Bush left office; Gitmo remains in operation, and so forth. But the ongoing importance of his presidency is substantive — key Bush policies remain compelling enough to retain — not political, as the Democrats had hoped.

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2014 NFL schedule: NFL's partnership with CBS leads to better Thursday night games (Shutdown Corner)
"Thursday Night Football" has traditionally been similar to holding out a cup of water for a marathon runner – they are desperate for anything to quench their thirst. The NFL knows their fans are desperate for football, and mediocre primetime matchups were traditionally scheduled on Thursday night. It is usually the one time of year Jacksonville, Buffalo, Oakland and St. Louis can enjoy the national spotlight despite. The league must have figured it's football, and you're going to watch no matter who is playing. However, that changed a bit this year after the NFL partnered with CBS to produce and televise seven games on Thursdays over the first half of the season. The NFL Network, which will simulcast the CBS Thursday games, will have seven late-season Thursday games all to itself. Also, two late-season games take place on Saturday, and this year’s schedule is banking on division rivalries to add more spice to the lineup. Green Bay will kick off the season on the road against Seattle on Sept. 4 in Week 1. That game will be televised on NBC, and Seattle defend its Super Bowl title against Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers. That game always features the defending champion and is always a marquee matchup. The Thursday games after that have been hit and miss, but that slate has been upgraded. Pittsburgh will play on the road against the Baltimore Ravens on Sept. 11 in Week 2. Baltimore was forced to play its first game of last season on the road against Denver after a Super Bowl victory, but the Ravens were given two consecutive home games to start this season. Most NFL coaches don't like playing a divisional game early in the season, but Pittsburgh and Baltimore will kick off its AFC North rivalry after one regular-season game. Green Bay’s home game against the Vikings in Week 5 marks the first week a team from last year’s playoffs appears on CBS' Thursday night slate. The last matchup between Green Bay and Minnesota at Lambeau Field in Week 12 in 2013 ended in a tie (26-26). New England will host the New York Jets in Week 7, which should feature a battle of Tom Brady against Geno Smith or Michael Vick. New York is expected to determine its starter during the preseason as coach Rex Ryan faces a do-or-die season. If Ryan’s team starts off slow, this game could determine his future in New York. CBS’ final Thursday game is San Diego at Denver in Week 8, another division rivalry that's also a rematch of last year’s AFC playoff game. Every one of CBS' Thursday games is a divisional game. The NFL Network takes over with New Orleans at Carolina in Week 9, followed by a slew of games with marginal interest. The most interesting game (right now) is Dallas visiting the Chicago Bears on Dec. 4. Dallas is notorious for its annual collapse in December, and if that occurs again, it could signal the end of coach Jason Garrett’s tenure with the Cowboys. In the past few years, if fans have turned on "Thursday Night Football" it was generally just because there was any game on, even though the matchup usually wasn't good. This year's Thursday schedule isn't great, but it's certainly better than it has been. Here is the Thursday schedule: Week 1, Sept. 4 (NBC): Green Bay at Seattle Week 2, Sept. 11 (CBS, NFLN): Pittsburgh at Baltimore Week 3, Sept. 18 (CBS, NFLN): Tampa Bay at Atlanta Week 4, Sept. 25 (CBS, NFLN): N.Y. Giants at Washington Week 5, Oct. 2 (CBS, NFLN): Minnesota at Green Bay Week 6, Oct. 9 (CBS, NFLN): Indianapolis at Houston Week 7, Oct. 16 (CBS, NFLN): N.Y. Jets at New England Week 8, Oct. 23 (CBS, NFLN): San Diego at Denver Week 9, Oct. 30 (NFLN): New Orleans at Carolina Week 10, Nov. 6 (NFLN): Cleveland at Cincinnati Week 11, Nov. 13 (NFLN): Buffalo at Miami Week 12, Nov. 20 (NFLN): Kansas City at Oakland Week 13, Dec. 4 (NFLN): Dallas at Chicago Week 14, Dec. 11 (NFLN): Arizona at St. Louis Week 15, Dec. 18 (NFLN): Tennessee at Jacksonville - - - - - - - Anwar S Richardson is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at NFLAnwar@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @AnwarRichardson

2014 NFL Schedule (The SportsXchange)
Games grouped by start times and listed alphabetically by home team. Listed times are local followed by Eastern.

NFL announces regular-season schedule (National Football Post)
Flexible scheduling expanded

NFL announce regular-season schedule (National Football Post)
Flexible scheduling expanded

Source: Virginia C Luke Bowanko visiting Jaguars today (National Football Post)
Center has visited Vikings, Packers

2014 NFL schedule: Packers-Seahawks 'Fail Mary' reunion kicks off season (Shutdown Corner)
The NFL isn't messing around with its 2014 schedule. The world champion Seattle Seahawks will kick off the season with a game not against their archrivals, the San Francisco 49ers, or the team they beat in the Super Bowl, the Denver Broncos, but rather with a foe that created controversy two years ago. Remember the replacement referee fiasco game  — aka, The Fail Mary — in Seattle in 2012? Yep, the NFL powers-that-be have orchestrated a rematch in Week 1 on Thursday, Sept. 4 on NBC in prime time. The league announced all 256 games for the regular season, and it features some interesting highlights: • Three Thanksgiving games that feature all NFC teams for the first time. • A new Thursday slate of games, split through the season by CBS and NFL Network, that kicks off in Week 2 with a rivalry game of the Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens. • Flex scheduling that can begin as early as Week 5 , which is a change from years past, when it typically began starting in Week 11. • Other key prime-time Week 1 games — Indianapolis Colts at Denver Broncos (NBC) on Sunday, Sept. 7, and the Monday night doubleheader (both games on ESPN): New York Giants at Detroit Lions for the early game and San Diego Chargers at Arizona Cardinals for the late game.  • A Super Bowl rematch of those Seahawks hosting the Broncos in Week 3. Also in that week, the Redskins' DeSean Jackson returns to Philadelphia for the first time since he was cut. • Three international games this year, up from two in 2013, all at London's Wembley Stadium. They are: Week 4, Sunday, Sept. 28, the Oakland Raiders vs. the Miami Dolphins (1 PM ET, CBS); Week 8, Sunday, Oct. 26, the Atlanta Falcons vs. the Lions at (9:30 AM ET, Fox — the first-ever nationally televised 9:30 AM kickoff); and Week 10, Sunday, Nov. 9, Jacksonville Jaguars vs. the Dallas Cowboys (1 PM ET, Fox). Now here's the entire schedule , week by week, for the 2014 NFL season.   - - - - - - - Eric Edholm is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at edholm@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @Eric_Edholm

15 worth the price of admission (National Football Post)
The 2014 NFL regular season schedule is loaded with marquee matchups between championship contenders.
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