Vol 1. No. 25.Baltimore, MD  Thu July 31st 2014GIVING YOU THE NEWS THE MSM IGNORES 
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Ubaldo feeling good following first rehab start
Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez on Wednesday said his right ankle "feels good" following Tuesday's rehab start. He will throw a side session later in the week before pitching this weekend, either on Sunday or Monday for Triple-A Norfolk or for the O's in the following week.

O's prospect Harvey out for season with elbow injury
Hunter Harvey, one of the Orioles top pitching prospects, has been shut down for the season after an MRI done Tuesday revealed he has a strained flexor mass.

Norris aiming to help O's secure series sweep
Bud Norris and the Orioles will bid for a three-game series sweep against Tyler Skaggs and the Angels on Thursday night at Camden Yards.

Three injured after SUV crashes into Towson government building
Three people were injured after an SUV crashed into the Drumcastle government building in Towson Thursday morning, Baltimore County police said.








Worn, fractured rail caused Ellicott City train derailment, NTSB determines
Two women killed in accident played no role in derailment, final report says

Two women killed in accident played no role in derailment, final report says.








Bengies Drive-In appeal denied
Bengies owner D. Edward Vogel pledged to appeal the decision to the Maryland Court of Appeals.








Social Security nominee to face questions at Senate hearing
Carolyn W. Colvin was nominated in June

Carolyn W. Colvin will face questions from members of the Senate Finance Committee today who are considering her nomination to lead the Social Security Administration.








Motorcyclist killed in Annapolis crash
A motorcyclist was killed following a three-vehicle crash in Annapolis Wednesday evening, Anne Arundel County Police said.







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Perhaps the best part of blogging or the internet in general is the occasional discovery of something unexpected.Over on Baltimore Reporter and Conservative Thoughts is a great and thought provoking article by Robert Farrow.I hope you will follow this link and read this great post.

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12/28/2010

Two from Powerline
Filed under: — Robert Farrow @ 10:58 pm

Barack Obama and Michael Vick

President Obama has an unfortunate habit of weighing in on controversies that are basically none of his business, most notoriously when he blasted the Cambridge police for arresting Henry Gates. This morning he did it again, telephoning Jeffrey Lurie, the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to express appreciation for the Eagles’ giving quarterback Michael Vick a second chance.

At the Washington Post, Ezra Klein terms this the “weirdest story of the morning,” noting that the White House now seems to have backed off on Obama’s comment about Vick, and instead characterizes the phone call as one relating to “plans for the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.” Klein thinks Obama was right the first time, and for once I agree.

Anyone who follows professional sports knows that there are many low-lifes in the ranks of professional athletes. Vick may well be one of them; certainly his running of a dog fighting ring was repellent. But the difference between Vick and pretty much everyone else is that Vick was actually punished for his misdeeds. He served two years in prison. In contrast, Ray Lewis’ experience was more typical: he was involved in a double murder, and his defense was that he only supplied the getaway car. Lewis got one year of probation and not long thereafter was the MVP of the Super Bowl.

In my view, Vick, having served his prison sentence, is even. He deserves the same employment opportunities as everyone else. The remarkable fact is that, after two years out of football, he is a better player now than he was before. If fans don’t want to cheer for him, that’s their business. But this time, I agree with Obama–on Vick, not “the use of alternative energy at Lincoln Financial Field.”

PAUL demurs: My view of Obama’s comments on Vick is less favorable. It’s fine that Obama sees Vick’s story as a heartwarming tale of redemption, though I don’t. But his attempt to translate that tale into a larger lesson for society is problematic.

According to the owner of the Eagles, Obama told him that “so many of the people who serve time never get a second chance; it’s never a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Obama reportedly added that he was happy the Eagles did something on such a national stage to show faith in giving someone a second chance after such a major downfall.

Actually it is not uncommon for athletes to get the opportunity to play for sports teams after being incarcerated. Sports teams will take just about anyone they think can help them win, regardless of past problems. For example, baseball fans of a certain age will recall that Gates Brown and Ron LeFlore went from prison to the Detroit Tigers farm system and then to the major leagues. The major difference between them and Vick is that Vick was already an established pro, meaning that his team probably had more reason to believe he would help it than the Tigers did with Brown and LeFlore.

Talented relief pitcher Steve Howe received something like seven chances to pitch in the Major Leagues following drug suspensions and/or positive test results (I don’t recall that he was ever incarcerated, but the “redemption” issue is comparable). I always reckoned that five of those chances were down to his fastball and, given the scarcity of quality lefty relievers, the other two were because he pitched left-handed.

But Obama wasn’t just off-base in suggesting that there was something exceptional about a very talented and successful athlete getting a second chance. His deeper fallacy was to suppose that the Eagles’ positive experience with Vick should serve as a model for employers generally.

I don’t know what the recidivism rate is for high-earning athletes who have been convicted of, in essence, murdering dogs. I suspect, however, that the Eagles were taking little risk that Vick would return to a life of crime.

But the recidivism rate for the average 20-something male who have been convicted of a felony is extremely high during the first few years after release from prison. This means that employers take an appreciable risk in hiring recently released felons, especially for certain types of jobs.

Accordingly, in my view there should not, in most cases, be “a level playing field for prisoners when they get out of jail.” Employers should feel free to take into account the risks of employing such individuals. The Eagles experience with Vick is a special case that should, and I’m pretty certain will, have little resonance for most employers considering whether to hire most ex-prisoners.

Obama’s suggestion to the contrary is a knee-jerk reaction. It betrays the same lack of seriousness that has plagued some of his other efforts to weigh in on issues that are none of his business.

also:

How do they like him now?

I think it’s clear that the Democrats expected George W. Bush to be the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to electoral politics. Frankly, I expected this as well, albeit to a lesser degree than the Dems did.

But that’s not how things are turning out. It’s not just that Democratic efforts to make the 2010 election a referendum on the Bush presidency failed (predictably enough). There is also plenty of evidence that Bush is no longer very unpopular, if indeed he is unpopular at all.

Today’s news brings us additional evidence on this score. First, a Gallup poll rates him as the second most admired American. He’s well behind Barack Obama but slightly ahead of Bill Clinton.

Second, sales of Bush’s new book, Decision Points, have reached two million. The book was released early last month. As Peter Wehner notes, Bill Clinton’s biography, My Life, has sold 2.2 million since it was published in 2004. Bush’s publisher, Crown, said it could not think of any other non-fiction book that sold even one million copies this year.

It’s possible that Bush rates second on the most admired list and sold so many books based solely on the view of his hard-core supporters. But other evidence shows that his comeback is broader than that. For example, Bush has run neck-and-neck with President Obama in hypothetical presidential matchups this year.

How do we account for Bush’s comeback? I don’t think he’s made much new headway among arch-conservatives. 2010 saw the right turn away even more decisively than before from Bush’s “compassionate” or “big government” conservatism. Nor is there much reason to believe that the left has come to view Bush in a new light.

More likely, Bush’s revival is driven by those closer to the center. This seems fitting, since Bush was far more of a centrist than many of his critics assumed. Both of the wars he initiated had bipartisan, and strong popular, support when he initiated them. And he reached across the aisle on issues like No Child Left Behind and the prescription drug benefit. He even tried at the beginning of his presidency to compromise with Democrats on judicial nominees.

But why has the center revised its views of Bush? I suspect it’s because of the contrast between him and his successor, the alleged post-partisan. Obama’s first two years were far more ideologically single-minded than was the Bush presidency.

Moreover, and at least as importantly, Obama’s periodic belligerence and petulance must have reminded many of how gracefully Bush carried himself. Though significantly less popular as president than Obama, and more widely reviled, Bush never seemed to whine and rarely attempted to blame others. Unlike Obama, he was willing to praise his predecessor. And he steadfastly declines to criticize his successor.

Finally, the issue that contributed the most to Bush’s loss of popularity among those in the center — the Iraq war — looks quite different today than it did when centrists turned against him over it. The war remains controversial, of course, but I doubt that it is widely viewed as a disaster these days.

The Bush presidency continues to be important. His tax policy has been extended; the war he initiated in Afghanistan is being waged more vigorously than when Bush left office; Gitmo remains in operation, and so forth. But the ongoing importance of his presidency is substantive — key Bush policies remain compelling enough to retain — not political, as the Democrats had hoped.

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Ravens' Rice: His actions 'totally inexcusable' (The Associated Press)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice says his actions against his then-fiancee were ''totally inexcusable'' and insisted he had never been a part of any domestic violence incidents before. Rice was arrested on assault charges following a Feb. 15 altercation in New Jersey in which he allegedly struck Janay Palmer. Rice has been accepted into a diversion program, which upon completion could lead to the charges being dropped. He received a two-game suspension from the NFL and a fine in excess of $500,000.

Ray Rice apologizes for role in domestic dispute, promises to be better man (Shutdown Corner)
Your browser does not support iframes. Ray Rice took questions from the media for the first time since a video showed him dragging his unconscious then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, out of an Atlantic City hotel elevator in February. Rice finally gave the public apology people have wanted out of him for months. "That's not me," Rice said. "My actions that night were totally inexcusable. I have to live with that the rest of my life." The Baltimore Ravens running back previously had  clumsily read a statement  in May following the incident and later was given a two-game suspension by commissioner Roger Goodell for his role in the incident. The suspension was roundly criticized as being too light, but Rice said missing two games, as well as feeling the public scorn for his role in the incident, has taken its toll on him. "I'm being punished on a day-to-day basis," Rice said. Other than Rice making himself look like a victim in that case, he handled himself well by admitting his mistakes, both during and after the incident.  "Last time I did not publicly apologize to my wife. ... Her pain is my pain," he said. "One thing I wanted to do today was apologize to my wife."  Rice spoke emotionally and — unlike last time — from the heart when the subject of his 2-year old daughter came up. He said he knows that one day she's going to hear and read about the troubles with Rice and Palmer when she's old enough. "One day she's going to know the power of Google," Rice said. "And we're going to have to explain that to her, explain what happened that day." Rice summed up how "30 seconds of [his] life" has affected his life and what he's now left to deal with. "I let my wife down, I let my daughter down, I let my wife's family down ... I let so many people down," he said. Asked if it was the first time he ever hit a women, Rice said that the incident with his now-wife was the first time he ever committed an act of domestic violence. "It was a one-time incident," he said. Despite that, Rice also indicated that he knew he needed counseling.   "I am a man to say that I needed help," Rice said. "I am not afraid to ask for help." Rice said he and Palmer plan to do what they can to one day help other victims of domestic violence. "When the time is right ... me and my wife, we want to go out there and help people — anybody, violence of any kind," he said. "... We will go out there and help as many people as we can and speak out against domestic violence." Rice tried his best to deflect some of the tougher questions, saying multiple times he was "trying to move forward" from the incident. But he made sure one more time to take the blame. "I am here to say that I made the biggest mistake of my life," Rice said. "She can do no wrong; she's an angel." Ravens fans appear to be on Rice's side firmly, as he was cheered at the team's practice session the other night at M&T Stadium as well as in practices after that. But the general public's response has been far different. "I know a lot of people lost respect," he said. "That's my fault." Head coach John Harbaugh was not asked about Rice in his press conference Thursday, but on Wednesday he said Rice has handled things well to this point after the ugly incident.  “You'll see his heart, just like you saw it last time,” Harbaugh said, per the Baltimore Sun. “He’s not going to give you some polished press conference. That’s not Ray. Ray’s going to speak from the heart.” It appeared Rice did. Just several months later than most people hoped or expected. More NFL coverage from Yahoo Sports: - - - - - - - Eric Edholm is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at edholm@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @Eric_Edholm

Contrite Ravens RB Rice 'owns mistake' (The SportsXchange)
A contrite Ray Rice apologized publicly to his wife, his 2-year-old daughter, his mother and children wearing No. 27 Baltimore Ravens jerseys in his first public comments since the NFL suspended him two games for a domestic violence incident in February. "My actions that night were totally inexcusable," Rice said.

Ravens DE Urban tears ACL (The SportsXchange)
Baltimore Ravens rookie defensive end Brent Urban is out for the season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee.

Team Report - GREEN BAY PACKERS (The SportsXchange)
GM Thompson gets contract extension from Packers

Team Report - SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS (The SportsXchange)
Davis reports to 49ers camp

Team Report - BALTIMORE RAVENS (The SportsXchange)
Ravens Rice receives two-game suspension

Team Report - CLEVELAND BROWNS (The SportsXchange)
Browns will take a run at 2014

Monroe anchors Flacco's blind side as Ravens LT (The Associated Press)
Eugene Monroe is right where he wants to be: anchoring the left side of the Baltimore Ravens offensive line. The Ravens hope he stays there a long time, as evidenced by the five-year, $37.5 million contract they gave him in March. The bar at left tackle is high in Baltimore, given that the team's first-ever draft pick was tackle Jonathan Ogden, now a member of the Hall of Fame. Since Ogden's retirement after the 2007 season, however, the Ravens have struggled to find a permanent answer at the position.

NFL roundup: Cowboys LT Smith signs eight-year extension (The SportsXchange)
The Dallas Cowboys signed left tackle Tyron Smith to an eight-year extension worth close to $98 million. The total value of the deal is close to $110 million.

Steelers to retire Hall of Famer Greene's No. 75 (The Associated Press)
The Pittsburgh Steelers are retiring Hall of Fame defensive end Joe Greene's number No. 75. The team announced Wednesday that Greene will be honored during a ceremony on Nov. 2 when the Steelers host the Baltimore Ravens. Greene, the fourth overall pick in the 1969 NFL draft, helped Pittsburgh win four Super Bowls during his 13-year career. The announcement comes just over a month after the passing of former Steelers coach Chuck Noll, who drafted Greene to become the cornerstone of the ''Steel Curtain'' defense.

Steelers to retire Greene's No. 75 (The SportsXchange)
The Pittsburgh Steelers announced Wednesday they will retire Hall of Fame defensive tackle Joe Greene's No. 75 in a ceremony on Nov. 2. The Steelers will host the Baltimore Ravens at Heinz Field that day. Greene's number will become just the second that the Steelers retired, joining Ernie Stautner in achieving that distinction. Greene, the leader of the "Steel Curtain" defense during the 1970s, helped lead the Steelers to four Super Bowl victories and six AFC Championship game appearances.

Browns hope they are on the run in 2014 (The SportsXchange)
The Cleveland Browns scored only four rushing touchdowns last season and managed just 1,383 yards on the ground, so in the offseason general manager Ray Farmer made a point of changing that unit. Four days into training camp, running back is the most improved segment of the offense. Ben Tate is running with the first team, but rookie third-round draft pick Terrance West is pressing him. Tate, West and undrafted rookie Isaiah Crowell are new.

Tuesday's Sports In Brief (The Associated Press)
The NCAA agreed to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports' governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn't go nearly far enough. The deal, filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, calls for the NCAA to toughen return-to-play rules for players who receive head blows and create a $70 million fund to pay for thousands of current and former athletes to undergo testing to determine whether they suffered brain trauma while playing football and other contact sports. Unlike a proposed settlement in a similar lawsuit against the NFL, this deal does not set aside any money to pay players who suffered brain trauma. BASEBALL LOS ANGELES (AP) - Vin Scully is staying in the booth for the Los Angeles Dodgers.
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